REVIEW: STILL LIFE WITH BREAD CRUMBS, BY ANNA QUINDLEN

91nME4-wWxL._SL1500_The career of photographer Rebecca Winter took off like an accidental thing. Serendipitously. Her talent seemed to spring from discovering and photographing the detritus of domestic life. Her first and most famous photograph, in the beginning, was called “Still Life with Bread Crumbs.”

But time passed, people moved on, she was almost a has-been. And her bank balances dwindled as her expenses rose.

At the age of 60, Rebecca sublet her New York apartment and rented a less expensive cottage in the country. And so began another accidental journey, as she rediscovered her talent in new ways.

Along the way, Rebecca met country people with small town values…and one of them was a roofer named Jim Banks. Colorful people, too, like Sarah, who had a shop named Tea for Two (or More).

Still Life with Bread Crumbs: A Novel is the story of one woman reinventing herself, without purposely doing so. Accidentally.

I loved this story and the author’s brilliant prose that made me smile, cry, and then laugh a little. I could visualize the characters and the settings. I felt as though I had journeyed there along with her and the people she met. Five stars.